Art

I Am Agne Kisonaite And I Won World Guinness Record For Building The Biggest „Lipstick Tower“

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I’m an artist Agne Kisonaite, but usually I go under pseudonym AgneArt.

My major is paintings, but I also do design furniture, handmade carpets, make art installations. My art pieces has won me Lithuanian national design prize ’15 and my art object ‘Lipstick Tower’ shown in Hong Kong has achieved World Guinness Record in 2015.

After my studies, through last 7 years as a professional artist, I have developed knowledge and techniques that allow me to bring others into my world full of bright colours and positive emotions. My subject of art is woman, feminine world, their consumerism and artificial beauty.

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World record for the biggest lipstick sculpture

I used 18’399 lipsticks to make a 3,03 meter Lipstick Tower art object and broke the Guinness World record for the largest lipstick sculpture.

It appeared that internet has a lot more power than I ever assumed. One sunny summer day I have received an inquiry from Hong Kong’s agency. They have found my project called “Giant Lipstick” and were wondering, if I could make some kind of similar ‘sculpture’ as a Christmas decoration for their client – a big shopping mall in Hong Kong. Of course, why not!

Idea for “Lipstick Tower” – the biggest art object installation I have made so far – was born. I have carefully calculated proportions and made construction drawings – so that the art object would look appealing and proportions are kept. As far as I have made one before, construction of a second one was easier. The tricky part was that as long as the object was subject to world record, none of other materials besides lipsticks and glue could be used. After making many blueprints, started to look where to get so many lipsticks, in which colours are they available. All process of drawings, calculations and searching for construction materials took about two months.

Later, the installation was completed with the help of 10 volunteers and took one more month. Because Guinness World Record representatives have asked to do so, I have recording all the footage of making this object.

Afterwards, it was shipped in separate pieces to Hong Kong, where I have assembled into one object. On November 10, a commission of Guinness World Records came to Hong Kong to take a look at the structure and included in the coveted list of world records.

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From waste – to decoration

Nail polish is one of the most commonly used products in decorative cosmetics. My other art pieces – such as “Lipstick Tower@Hong Kong”, “Giant Lipstick”, “Modern Lithuanian” – draw attention to the recycling issue: makeup goods are often non-recyclable. This is why “Glass Blowing” project seemed meaningful to me – these 1969 nail polish bottles didn’t end up as a waste: now they grace our home with their lively presence.

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Insulin syringes sculpture ‘Diabetes’

About 382 million people in the world are sick with diabetes. I have only realized that when I came to know that I am one of them.

This is how I came up with an idea to draw attention to this fast growing disease (diabetes). I will create an art object out of ~5000 used insulin syringes, collected from people who has diabetes. The object would be around 3 m height and reflect a woman, sitting on a chair and taking usual insulin injection into her abdomen. I would disinfected used syringes and glue them one to each other in a way that construct a monument statue. With this aesthetically looking, but at the same time shocking art object I try to represent both: enormous growth of the disease in the world (how much of insulin syringes is consumed by a man), my constraint abidance with it (sitting position = humility) and sensitive hope that one day diabetes would be cured.

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I plan to finish this project by mid 2017. You can follow this project on my Instagram feed.

Handmade carpets and Armchair design with AgneArt paintings

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